Tuesday, August 4, 2009

10 Week Book Giveaway--Week #8

For details about this contest visit here. But basically, all you have to do is answer this week's question in the comments and on Friday, I'll choose one of the names and announce the winner.

Actually, this week, I'm going to have YOU ask the questions (I'm stealing this idea from James Dashner).

So, let me know if you have a question for me (a G-rated question) . . . you know, anything like what's my favorite color to how I bribe my kids to read my books :) I'll answer them in the comment trail, and post the whole thing on Friday with the announcement of this week's winner.

Thanks!

16 comments:

Cheri Chesley said...

So, how DO you get your kids to read? :) Seriously, though, I have a question that I need to ask established LDS authors but I don't think it's appropriate for a public forum like this, so I'll go with a less spiritually personal one.

This is my favorite question to ask authors: When did you first start to write? Grade school? High school? When is the first time writing touched your heart and soul?

Tamara Hart Heiner said...

I'll ask a question: when did you get the idea for Abinadi? Did you always picture it that way when you read the scriptures? or did the back story only come after much thought and deliberation?

Heather B. Moore said...

Cheri, Luckily my books are on Audio and my kids listen to those ;) I started writing my first book when I was 30 years old. I had always enjoyed writing letters, etc., but it never occured to me to try writing a novel. I was working on my grandmother's biography and I thought that the time period she grew up in was really fascinating. I also thought the events during that era would make a cool novel. I wrote my first book in about 3 months so you can say that the writing bug hit pretty hard.

Tamara: I had the idea for Abinadi before I wrote the final volume of my Out of Jerusalem series. I was trying to decide what to do next, and I wanted a place in the Book of Mormon where a series would be a good fit. I didn't decide to have Abinadi be a younger man until I started on the first chapter. The story is obviously outlined in the scriptures, but most of the character and plot fill-ins come as I'm writing. For me writing is like reading a book, I don't know what's going to happen in the next chapter. I don't know who all of the characters are as I begin. In the Abinadi book, I had no intention of using Alma as much as I did. You can say that he made a grand stage entrance on his own. When I read the scriptures, I get caught up in the most minute things--and a lot of the emotions. I just ask a lot of questions, and if I can't find the answer, then I start to theorize.

Kami said...

Ok, I'm dying to know what it was like living in Egypt! I have always wanted to visit there ever since I saw my first picture of a pyramid. What is the culture like? Did you draw experiences for your books from living there? Did you get to go inside a pyramid? Oops, I think I've got more than one question here...

jenheadjen said...

As a kid, teen, and young adult, what did you want to be when you "grew up"?

Sorry - I have 2 also. Do you feel any kind of opposition as you're writing these incredible stories?

Daron Fraley said...

I am intrigued with your international experiences. Since you also lived in Jerusalem, can you tell us what a couple of your most interesting memories are of being there, whether it was related to the culture, the region, the people, or whatever?

Charlie Moore said...

Heather,

You're a successful author, at least in the LDS market. Are you happy with the course your career has taken to this point? Are you working toward something specific beyond today? How has writing changed you as a person? Sorry, three questions, but the theme is the same.

Charlie

Heather B. Moore said...

Great Questions Everyone!

Kami, I was 8 when we lived in Egypt. Then we've been back to visit since then. It's very hot. Very dusty. Very crowded. Very loud. We lived in an apartment and walked to the American school. Yes, I've been inside the pyramids. Dark and narrow and low ceiling. Lots of stairs. If you are claustrophobic, I wouldn't recommend it. Anyone with light skin and light hair definitely stands out as a tourist and you'll be approached by vendors constantly.

Heather B. Moore said...

Jen, I always wanted to be a clothing designer. I used to sew all of the time and majored in Fashion Merchandising in college. Maybe it will still happen :) And yes, sometimes I do feel opposition. Mostly in time and self-doubt will creep in.

Daron, I have an essay that will be published in October in the Christmas booklet "All Is Bright" that talks about when I lived in Jerusalem as a 16 year old. But in very short form, I think that I learned a lot about myself and what type of person I wanted to become. What I stood for and what I believed in also played a major role. When you live around another culture, you are suddenly the minority and you develop a sense of self pretty quickly. One of my most interesting memories is probably riding the bus with Israeli soldiers, carrying machine guns (AK-47's).

Heather B. Moore said...

Charlie--Yes, I'm happy where I am right now in the publishing world. Of course, I'd love to be NY Times bestseller like any author. I think publishing in the LDS market has given me a lot of opportunities to learn the craft and to learn the industry. Also how to edit and how to work with an editor. Revision is 50% of writing! I do have books that I've written for the national market that I hope will find a home, but I'll continue in the LDS market as well. Writing has definitely changed me as a person--or more specifically getting published. It's put me in the public eye more than I've ever thought I'd be. I'm very reserved and like to go about things in my own quiet way. But being an author, I can't always do that. I have to attend booksignings, etc. and have learned to become more outgoing. In fact, when my in-laws found out I had written a book, they said, "Heather wrote a whole book? What does she have to say? She's so quiet." LOL.

Taffy said...

What is the best way you have found to market your books?

Heather B. Moore said...

Taffy, I think it's a combination. Probably the main things I do is visit stores and talk to the employees/managers about my books. I also leave bookmarks while I'm there. Booksignings help, especially for the first couple of books. Getting reviews is important and I keep a newsletter list so that I can email updates every so often (which reminds me that I'm slacking in that area). Also, having a platform (whether it's on the how-to's of writing or your book topic) so that you can be available to speak to groups.

LAR said...

What is your favorite story in the scriptures? It can be anything from the Old Testament, New Testament, or Book of Mormon? If you could go visit a place or time in these places, where or when would you go visit?

Sandra said...

I just got back from Booksellers. I saw your new book- the cover is so fantastic in person! I am so excited for it to get here!

Heather B. Moore said...

LAR, I love the missionary stories of Alma and the sons of Mosiah. If I could go back to any time or place, it would be Christ's time, either in the old world or the new world where He appeared to the Nephites.

Sandra, I saw the book mock-up too. Did you look in side? They pasted the ALMA cover over an Anita Stanisfield book, for display purposes. LOL>

Sandra said...

Yes, I looked inside hoping that it would be a real book and not a mock up, because they almost always use mock ups, but I was hoping to get a glimpse of the real thing.